After Libya, Syria: Towards a new refugee crisis on the borders of Europe?

For the second time in less than a year an acute refugee crisis is looming in Europe’s neighbourhood. Libya in 2011 and Syria in 2012 have several features in common. In both cases, a civilian population has been exposed to a war which has seen rebels opposing the regular army. In both cases, a sizeable foreign population – between fewer than 100,000 and more than 1 million Iraqi refugees in Syria according to estimates, as compared with around 1.5 million migrant workers in Libya on the eve of the 2011 uprisings – have had to flee from danger. In both cases, these populations cross a land border to find refuge in a neighbouring country. Likewise in both cases, only the Mediterranean separates Europe from the theatre of operations. In 2011, the response of the European Union and its Member States to the influx of refugees at Libya’s borders was limited, to say the least, by comparison with the massive solidarity shown by Libya’s African neighbours. Will this happen again in 2012 with Syria? Several European States have spoken up in the search for a political solution in Syria. But will they take part in addressing the emergency created by a new refugee crisis, a crisis in which all the concerned states are linked with the EU by association agreements?

As UN-Arab League envoy Kofi Annan warned, while visiting Syrian refugee camps in Turkey on 10 April, displacement of people caused by unrest in Syria should not be overlooked. UNHCR, the international refugee agency, has already recorded (12 April 2012) 44,570 Syrian refugees in bordering countries: 24,674 in Turkey; 10,386 in Lebanon; 8,270 in Jordan; and 1,240 in Iraq. [1] These numbers do not include either Syrian refugees, who are not registered with UNHCR, those who left for countries that do not border Syria (e.g. Arab Gulf States), or Iraqis in Syria who returned to Iraq or found shelter in another country. Non-registered refugees are probably present only in small numbers in Turkey, where from the outset the State jointly managed the crisis with UNHCR. But likely a majority of refugees in Jordan and Lebanon are not registered. In Jordan the Governor of Zarqa (the governorate bordering Syria) estimates that 100,000 Syrians have been displaced to his country[2]. And in Lebanon UNHCR itself assesses that refugees from Syria number 20,000 of whom 7,500 would be unrecorded refugees sheltered in regions where UNHCR is not operating, in particular the Beqaa Valley and Beirut.[3]  

Syrian refugees move with their whole families and they rapidly risk becoming destitute in the country where they find first asylum. Males and females are in equal numbers and half of them are children and adolescents (48%) with 17% at pre-school age (0-4 years) and 31% at school age (5-17 years).[4]  In this context, their access to basic resources (food, clothing, etc.), to decent housing and to public services (health, school) puts enormous strain on the receiving society as well as on the refugees themselves. As soon as the money they could take with them in their flight dries up access to employment will become the prime issue.

Syria’s neighbours (with the exception of Israel) have not, to date, restricted the access of Syrian refugees to their territory. However, they manage the inflow of refugees differently. InTurkey, Syrian refugees have been regrouped into nine camps managed by the Turkish authorities dispersed in the provinces ofGaziantep, Kilis, Hatay, and Sanliurfa along the border. In contrast, in the other countries, the refugees have settled in inhabited districts (towns and villages) where they are hosted by relatives, accommodated by local communities, or, alternatively, where they are forced to rent a house.

In Turkey, medical care is provided in the camps or, if necessary, in public hospitals in Antalya. In addition, 68 school classes have been created with Arabic-speaking professors[5]. UNHCR supports the Turkish government, as well as other international organisations and the Turkish Red Crescent Society. Since February, UNHCR has been permanently present in Hatay to support the government. To date, Turkey has not asked for any additional international assistance. But it would consider doing so if the influx of refugees went on. According to the Turkish liberal newspaper Milliyet, 9. April 2012, if the number of Syrian refugees in Turkey exceeded 50,000, Ankara would consider the creation  of  “humanitarian corridors” at the border, protected by the Turkish army[6].

In Lebanonand Jordan, the refugees’ situation varies greatly from one region to another. UNHCR and the Lebanese Higher Relief Committee provide assistance to the refugees, but their mandate is limited to North Lebanon, and they cannot intervene in the rest of the country. In Jordan, UNCHR works together with other UN agencies and with local NGOs, in particular with the Jordanian Hashemite Charity Organisation (JHCO). However, in those two countries, assistance to refugees depends largely on local communities and governments which guarantee free access to public services including hospitals for wounded refugees, and schools. However, the pressure exerted at the local level by the presence of a rising number of refugees is getting greater and greater especially in communities with limited resources. In particular, schooling raises several problems. The Jordanian and Lebanese governments have admitted Syrian children in the local schools. But schooling rates are low, especially in Lebanon where they are estimated to be 52% at primary, and 9% at the secondary level. [7]

The situation of Syrian refugees in Lebanon raises specific issues. Relations between Lebanon and Syria are complex at the economic and political levels. Lebanon already hosts several hundred  thousand Syrian workers. Moreover, Syrian and Lebanese populations living in the areas close to the border, especially in the North, are traditionally linked by close familial, social and economic ties. Ultimately, the Lebanese government is dominated by the 8 of March Movement, which included Hezbollah and the parties supporting the strategic alliance with Syria against Israel; while the Movement of March 14 gathering parties opposed to Bachar al-Assad regime is in opposition. Thus, the Syrian regime can count on the support of the Lebanese government, to a certain extent, while the Syrian insurgents, in particular the Free Syrian Army, are backed, directly and indirectly, by the Lebanese opposition, in particular its Sunni component.

The situation in Syria not only threatens Syrians, but also many migrants and refugees already present in Syrian territory, whose number is difficult to assess. While Syria is considered the main host country for Iraqi refugees, these have never been properly recorded. There have been claimed to be one million, according to a highly controversial estimate of the Syrian government, once endorsed by UNHCR[8]. In addition, there are migrant workers of various nationalities, whose numbers vary from 80,000 to 150,000[9]. Moreover, Syria not being part of the Geneva Convention on Refugees of 1951, many people who would be refugees in another context live there as economic migrants.

So far, third-country nationals who have crossed the Syrian border to neighbouring countries have not contacted any UN agency[10]. Yet, their protection could later on become an issue. Jordan and Lebanon have not signed the Geneva Convention on refugees. Turkey is a party to the Convention, but has not adopted its 1967 protocol which would lift the geographical reservation limiting its implementation to European nationals. Refugees are thus unlikely to find there the protection they need and would have little chance of integrating locally should the crisis last. The situation seems even more complex in Lebanon where most refugees entered illegally, due to border crossing risks (Syrian army checks, mines) and since some refugees are also combatants in the Free Syrian Army.[11]

To face the situation in the coming months in a coordinated and consistent way, UNHCR appointed a regional coordinator for Syrian refugees last March[12] and presented a regional Action Plan[13], in coordination with seven UN agencies, twenty seven national and international NGOs and the receiving countries. This plan is based on estimations according to which, in the next six months, assistance will be needed for about 100,000 persons in Turkey, Jordan, Lebanon and Iraq. The aim of this Plan is to guarantee that Syrian and foreign nationals fleeing Syria will have access to the neighbouring states and to international protection, that their basic needs will be met and so as to consider the measures to be taken in case of massive flows of people. A call for 84 million dollars was launched on 23 March to fund this plan[14].

Europe has a crucial role to play, not only in finding a solution to the political situation, but also in supporting the refugees, an issue from which it tends to disengage. The financial aid to the receiving countries is currently a priority. The decision of 22 March to raise EU aid for the victims of the humanitarian crisis in Syria from 3 to 10 million euros is a positive step. But it seems already insufficient as events have overtaken it. This aid aims at funding those people who have been wounded or constrained to flee the violence in the country, and will transit through the European Commission’s humanitarian partners, notably the International Red Cross and UNHCR. [15] In addition, it is important that the Member States do not prevent people fleeing Syria and fearing individual persecutions from acceding to asylum. Regarding the specific situation of Iraqi refugees fleeing Syria, EU member states should facilitate their resettlement, which has been enhanced by the Joint EU resettlement programme for 2013 adopted by the EU last March[16]. They are supposed to pledge by 1 May 2012 to inform the European Commission about the people they wish to resettle, and they will benefit from the financial aid of the European Refugee Fund if this meets the defined priorities, among which are Iraqi refugees in Syria, Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon.

If the receiving countries come to be overwhelmed by the collective flow of people fleeing violence in Syria and if they can no longer offer an appropriate protection, then the EU’s temporary protection should be activated[17] in order to provide a rapid (prima facie) response and to offer solidarity. Will the Member States agree to use this resource? Certainly, they refused to do so in response to the Libyan crisis despite the European Parliament’s and UNHCR’s recommendations.

The MPC Team


[1] http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php

[2]http://www.petra.gov.jo/Public_News/Nws_NewsDetails.aspx?Site_Id=1&lang=2&NewsID=66217&CatID=13&Type=Home&GType=1

[3] Lebanon Weekly Update 06 Apr 2012: http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php

[4] http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php

http://www.refugeesinternational.org/policy/field-report/syrian-refugees-lebanon-preparing-worst

[5] http://www.unhcr.org/cgi-bin/texis/vtx/search?page=search&docid=4f5f493e6&query=syrian

[6] http://www.lexpress.fr/actualites/1/monde/refugies-syriens-tension-a-la-frontiere-turque-avant-une-visite-de-kofi-annan_1102577.html

[7] http://www.refugeesinternational.org/policy/field-report/syrian-refugees-lebanon-preparing-worst

http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/syrian-children-tripoli-paying-price-politics

[8] http://www.carim.org/public/migrationprofiles/MP_Syria_EN.pdf ; http://www.unhcr.org/pages/49e486a76.html

[9] http://www.carim.org/public/migrationprofiles/MP_Syria_EN.pdf; http://www.unhcr.org/4f6c80a49.html (p. 9)

[10] http://www.unhcr.org/4f6c80a49.html

[11] http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/wadi-khaled-free-syrian-army-base-lebanon-i

http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/wadi-khaled-free-syrian-army-base-lebanon-ii

http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/wadi-khaled-free-syrian-army-base-lebanon-iii

[12] http://www.unhcr.org/cgi-bin/texis/vtx/search?page=search&docid=4f5f493e6&query=syrian

[13] http://www.unhcr.org/4f6c80a49.html

[14] http://www.unhcr.org/cgi-bin/texis/vtx/search?page=search&docid=4f6c501e6&query=syrian

[15]http://europa.eu/rapid/pressReleasesAction.do?reference=IP/12/273&format=HTML&aged=0&language=EN&guiLanguage=en

[16] For more information on this topic, please consult the website of the KNOW RESET project : http://www.know-reset.eu/?c=00069

[17] Directive 2001/55/CE: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:32001L0055:FR:HTML

Advertisements

Après la Libye, la Syrie : vers une nouvelle crise de réfugiés aux frontières de l’Europe ?

Pour la seconde fois en moins d’un an, une crise aiguë de réfugiés se profile au voisinage de l’Europe. Entre la Libye de 2011 et la Syrie de 2012, les parallèles ne manquent pas. Dans les deux cas, une population civile est exposée à la guerre que se livrent la rébellion et l’armée régulière ; dans les deux cas, une importante population étrangère – réfugiés Irakiens en Syrie (dont le nombre, inconnu, varie entre moins de 100,000 et plus d’un million selon les estimations) et travailleurs immigrés en Libye (peut-être un million et demi à la veille du soulèvement de 2011) — est menacée dans sa présence même ; dans les deux cas, ces deux populations passent une frontière terrestre pour chercher refuge dans un pays voisin ; dans les deux cas, seule la Méditerranée sépare l’Europe du théâtre des opérations. En 2011, la réponse de l’Union européenne et de ses Etats membres à l’afflux de réfugiés fut pour le moins faible par comparaison avec la solidarité massive dont témoignèrent les  voisins africains de la Libye. En sera-t-il de même en 2012 avec la Syrie ? Les Etats européens font entendre leur voix dans la recherche d’une solution politique en Syrie, mais prendront-ils part à la résolution de la situation d’urgence créée par ce nouvel afflux de réfugiés au voisinage de l’UE, d’autant que tous les pays concernés sont liés à l’UE par des accords d’association ?

La question des déplacements de personnes liés à la situation politique en Syrie ne doit pas être sous-estimée, comme nous le rappelle la visite de l’Envoyé spécial des Nations Unis et de la Ligue arabe pour la Syrie Kofi Annan dans des camps de réfugiés syriens en Turquie le 10 avril dernier. L’Agence internationale pour les réfugiés, le HCR, a déjà enregistré (12 avril 2012) 44,570 réfugiés syriens dans les pays frontaliers : 24,674 en Turquie, 10,386 au Liban, 8,270 en Jordanie et 1,240 en Irak.[1] Ces chiffres n’incluent pas ceux des réfugiés qui ne sont pas enregistrés auprès du HCR, ni les Syriens partis vers des pays non frontaliers (notamment dans le Golfe), ni enfin les réfugiés irakiens en Syrie retournés en Irak ou ayant gagné une autre destination. Si le nombre de réfugiés non enregistrés par le HCR est vraisemblablement faible en Turquie, où l’Etat a dès le départ géré la crise avec l’appui du HCR, la majorité des réfugiés en Jordanie et au Liban ne sont probablement pas enregistrés. En Jordanie, le Gouverneur de Zarqa (province frontalière de la Syrie) estime à 100,000 le nombre total de Syriens déplacés dans le pays[2] ; et au Liban, le HCR lui-même indique que les réfugiés syriens seraient environ 20,000, dont 7,500 non-inscrits dans ses registres se trouveraient dans les régions où le HCR n’opère pas directement, en particulier la Bekaa et Beyrouth.[3]

Les réfugiés quittent la Syrie par familles entières et sont pour la plupart extrêmement démunis lorsqu’ils arrivent dans les pays d’accueil. Les femmes et les hommes sont en nombre égaux, et les enfants et adolescents représentent près de la moitié (48%) des réfugiés avec 17% d’enfants d’âge préscolaire (0-4 ans) ; 31% d’âge scolaire (5-17 ans).[4] Dans ce contexte, l’accès des réfugiés aux ressources de base (nourriture, équipement, etc.), à un logement décent, et aux services publics (santé, école) soulève de nombreux problèmes. Bientôt, lorsque leurs ressources seront épuisées, risque de se poser la question de leur accès à l’emploi.

Les pays frontaliers de la Syrie (à l’exception d’Israël) n’ont pas limité jusqu’à présent l’accès de leur territoire aux réfugiés syriens. Ils ont cependant adopté des approches différentes face à l’afflux de réfugiés. En Turquie, les réfugiés syriens sont regroupés dans neuf camps érigés par l’autorité publique dans les provinces frontalières de Gaziantep, Kilis, Hatay et Sanliurfa. Au contraire, dans les autres pays, les réfugiés se sont installés dans des zones habitées (villes ou villages), où ils sont accueillis par des proches, pris en charge par les autorités locales, ou contraints de louer une habitation.

En Turquie, les soins médicaux sont fournis dans les camps et, si nécessaire, à l’hôpital public d’Antalya. En outre, 68 salles de classe y ont été créées avec des professeurs arabophones.[5] Le HCR soutient le gouvernement turc, ainsi que d’autres organisations internationales et la Société du Croissant Rouge turc. Depuis février 2012, il a établi une présence permanente dans la province d’Hatay pour soutenir le gouvernement. Pour le moment, la Turquie n’a pas fait appel à une aide internationale supplémentaire, mais elle envisagerait de le faire dans le cas où l’afflux de réfugiés continuerait. Le journal turc libéral Milliyet affirmait le 9 avril dernier que si le nombre de réfugiés syriens en Turquie dépassait les 50.000, Ankara envisagerait la création de “couloirs humanitaires” à la frontière, protégés par l’armée turque[6].

Au Liban et en Jordanie, la situation des réfugiés varie fortement d’une région à l’autre. Le HCR et le Haut Comité de Secours libanais assistent les réfugiés dans le nord, mais n’ont pas mandat pour intervenir dans le reste du pays. En Jordanie, le HCR collabore avec d’autres organisations onusiennes et ONG locales, notamment l’Organisation jordanienne hachémite de charité (JHCO). Toutefois, dans ces deux pays, l’aide dépend encore largement des communautés locales et du gouvernement qui garantit un accès gratuit aux services publics, en particulier aux hôpitaux pour les réfugiés blessés et aux écoles. Toutefois, la présence d’un nombre croissant de réfugiés exerce une pression de plus en plus forte au niveau local, en particulier parmi les communautés locales dont les ressources sont limitées. La scolarisation des enfants, notamment, soulève des problèmes. Les gouvernements jordaniens et libanais ont admis les enfants syriens dans les écoles locales mais leur taux de scolarisation est faible, en particulier au Liban où il est évalué à 52 % dans le primaire et 9 % dans le secondaire.[7]

La situation des réfugiés syriens au Liban soulève des enjeux spécifiques. En effet, les relations entre le Liban et la Syrie sont complexes aux plans économique et politique. Le Liban  accueille déjà plusieurs centaines de milliers de travailleurs syriens. De plus, les populations des régions frontalières entretiennent traditionnellement des relations familiales, sociales et économiques étroites, en particulier au nord du Liban. Enfin, le gouvernement libanais est dominé par le Mouvement du 8 mars, qui regroupe le Hezbollah et les partis favorables à l’alliance stratégique avec la Syrie contre Israël, tandis que le Mouvement du 14 mars rassemble dans l’opposition les partis opposés au régime de Bachar al-Assad. Le régime syrien peut donc compter, dans une certaine mesure, sur le soutien du gouvernement libanais, tandis que les opposants syriens, en particulier l’Armée Syrienne Libre, sont appuyés, directement et indirectement, par l’opposition libanaise, en particulier sa composante sunnite. L’accueil réservé aux réfugiés syriens au Liban dépend donc en partie de l’impact de la crise syrienne sur la scène politique libanaise.

La situation en Syrie ne menace pas seulement les Syriens, mais également les nombreux migrants et réfugiés déjà présents sur le territoire syrien, dont le nombre est difficile à évaluer. Alors que la Syrie est considérée comme le principal pays d’accueil des réfugiés irakiens, ceux-ci n’ont jamais été comptabilisés. Ils seraient 1 million, selon l’estimation controversée du gouvernement syrien[8]. S’y ajoutent des travailleurs migrants de diverses nationalités, dont le nombre varierait entre 80 000 et 150 000[9]. Par ailleurs, la Syrie n’étant pas partie à la Convention de Genève de 1951 sur les réfugiés, nombre de personnes qui dans un autre contexte seraient des réfugiés y vivent comme des migrants économiques.

Pour le moment, aucun ressortissant de pays tiers ayant traversé la frontière syrienne vers les pays voisins n’a encore approché une agence des Nations Unies[10], mais la question de leur protection pourrait se poser en termes aigus. La Jordanie et le Liban ne sont pas signataires de la Convention de Genève sur les réfugiés. La Turquie y est partie, mais n’a pas adhéré au protocole 1967 qui en levait la réserve géographique limitant sa portée aux ressortissants européens. Il est donc peu probable que les réfugiés y trouvent la protection dont ils ont besoin et l’on peut douter qu’ils seront intégrés localement si la crise devait perdurer. Par ailleurs, la situation apparait d’autant plus complexe au Liban que la plupart des réfugiés sont entrés illégalement, en raison des risques importants que présente le passage de la frontière (contrôles de l’armée syrienne, champs de mines), et du fait de la présence parmi les réfugiés de combattants de l’Armée Syrienne Libre.[11]

Afin de faire face à la situation des mois à venir de manière coordonnée et cohérente, le HCR a nommé en mars dernier un coordinateur régional pour les réfugiés syriens[12] et a présenté un Plan d’action régional[13] pour les réfugiés syriens en coordination avec 7 agences des Nations Unies, 27 ONG nationales et internationales et les gouvernements d’accueil. Ce plan est fondé sur des estimations selon lesquelles, dans les 6 mois à venir, une assistance sera nécessaire pour environ 100 000 personnes en Turquie, Jordanie, Liban et Iraq. Il vise à assurer aux Syriens et ressortissants étrangers fuyant la Syrie l’accès aux pays voisins et à la protection internationale, à répondre à leurs besoins de base et à envisager des mesures en cas d’afflux massif de personnes. Afin de soutenir financièrement ce plan, un appel a été lancé le 23 mars dernier pour recueillir 84 millions de dollars[14].

De son côté, l’Europe a un rôle crucial à jouer, non seulement dans la résolution de la situation politique, mais également dans le soutien aux réfugiés, question dont elle a malheureusement tendance à se désengager. Actuellement, l’aide financière aux Etats d’accueil est prioritaire. La décision du 22 mars dernier d’accroître l’aide de l’UE en faveur des victimes de la crise humanitaire en Syrie de 3 à 10 millions d’euros[15] va dans le bon sens, mais apparait d’ores et déjà insuffisante. Cette aide, destinée à financer l’assistance aux personnes ayant été blessées ou contraintes de fuir les violences en cours dans le pays, transitera par les partenaires humanitaires de la Commission européenne, notamment le Comité international de la Croix Rouge (CICR) et le HCR. En parallèle, il est important que les Etats membres n’entravent pas l’accès à la demande d’asile qui proviendrait de personnes fuyant la Syrie et risquant des persécutions individuelles. En ce qui concerne le cas particulier des réfugiés irakiens, les Etats membres de l’UE devraient faciliter leur réinstallation, favorisée par le programme conjoint de réinstallation pour 2013 adopté par l’Union européenne en mars dernier[16]. Ils doivent indiquer à la Commission européenne avant le 1er mai 2012 quelles sont les personnes qu’ils souhaitent réinstaller et bénéficieront de l’aide financière du Fonds européen pour les réfugiés si celles-ci correspondent aux priorités définies, parmi lesquelles les réfugiés irakiens se trouvant en Syrie, en Turquie, en Jordanie et au Liban.

Dans le cas où les Etats d’accueil se verraient débordés par l’afflux collectif des personnes fuyant les violences en Syrie et où ils ne seraient plus à même d’assurer une protection adéquate, la protection temporaire de l’UE devrait être activée[17] afin d’apporter une réponse rapide (prima facie) et solidaire de l’UE. Mais les Etats membres accepteront-ils d’y recourir, après avoir refusé de le faire dans le cas de la Libye, et alors même que le Parlement européen et le HCR l’avaient recommandée ?

L’équipe du MPC


[1] http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php

[2]http://www.petra.gov.jo/Public_News/Nws_NewsDetails.aspx?Site_Id=1&lang=2&NewsID=66217&CatID=13&Type=Home&GType=1

[3] Lebanon Weekly Update 06 Apr 2012: http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php

[4] http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php

http://www.refugeesinternational.org/policy/field-report/syrian-refugees-lebanon-preparing-worst

[5] http://www.unhcr.org/cgi-bin/texis/vtx/search?page=search&docid=4f5f493e6&query=syrian

[6] http://www.lexpress.fr/actualites/1/monde/refugies-syriens-tension-a-la-frontiere-turque-avant-une-visite-de-kofi-annan_1102577.html

[7] http://www.refugeesinternational.org/policy/field-report/syrian-refugees-lebanon-preparing-worst

http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/syrian-children-tripoli-paying-price-politics

[8] http://www.carim.org/public/migrationprofiles/MP_Syria_EN.pdf ; http://www.unhcr.org/pages/49e486a76.html

[9] http://www.carim.org/public/migrationprofiles/MP_Syria_EN.pdf; http://www.unhcr.org/4f6c80a49.html (p. 9)

[10] http://www.unhcr.org/4f6c80a49.html

[11] http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/wadi-khaled-free-syrian-army-base-lebanon-i

http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/wadi-khaled-free-syrian-army-base-lebanon-ii

http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/wadi-khaled-free-syrian-army-base-lebanon-iii

[12] http://www.unhcr.org/cgi-bin/texis/vtx/search?page=search&docid=4f5f493e6&query=syrian

[13] http://www.unhcr.org/4f6c80a49.html

[14] http://www.unhcr.org/cgi-bin/texis/vtx/search?page=search&docid=4f6c501e6&query=syrian

[15]http://europa.eu/rapid/pressReleasesAction.do?reference=IP/12/273&format=HTML&aged=0&language=FR&guiLanguage=en

[16] Pour plus d’information sur ce sujet, consulter le site du projet KNOW RESET: http://www.know-reset.eu/?c=00069

[17] Directive 2001/55/CE: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:32001L0055:FR:HTML


Frontex : vers une meilleure prise en compte des droits fondamentaux?

Frontex, l’Agence européenne pour la gestion de la coopération opérationnelle aux frontières extérieures, est dans la ligne de mire du Médiateur européen, qui a ouvert une enquête à son encontre sur la question du respect des droits fondamentaux le 6 mars dernier[1]. Cette initiative intervient alors même que l’Agence a été fortement critiquée par la société civile quant aux méthodes utilisées lors de ses opérations.

La création de l’Agence en 2004[2] s’inscrivait dans un contexte où l’approche des migrations était essentiellement centrée sur la sécurité. En effet, suite à l’abolition des contrôles aux frontières intérieures de la zone Schengen[3], la politique d’immigration développée à l’époque au niveau européen s’est essentiellement concentrée sur le renforcement des frontières extérieures. Elle visait notamment à mettre en place des critères communs d’entrée sur le territoire de l’Union, à renforcer les contrôles aux frontières extérieures et à conclure des accords avec des pays tiers – pays d’origine ou de transit – pour une gestion plus efficace des flux migratoires[4].

Cependant, cette approche de la migration principalement centrée sur la sécurité est remise en cause, en particulier par les ONG qui, depuis 10-15 ans, dénoncent les violations des droits de l’Homme auxquelles elle a conduit : traitements inhumains et dégradants, non-respect du droit d’asile, refoulement des migrants, en particulier vers des pays tiers –tels que la Libye – dans lesquels le respect des droits de l’homme n’est pas garanti. La pression est d’autant plus forte que la Charte des droits fondamentaux est juridiquement contraignante depuis l’entrée en vigueur du traité de Lisbonne et que le Conseil de l’Europe et la Cour européenne des droits de l’Homme se sont déjà prononcés dans ce domaine[5]. Dans ce contexte, Frontex sera-t-elle capable d’évoluer pour intégrer aux côtés de son objectif initial de sécurité celui de respect des droits fondamentaux ?

Dans cette optique, la révision du règlement « Frontex » adoptée en octobre 2011[6] représente une évolution notable, car elle prévoit pour la première fois des mesures concrètes destinées à assurer le respect des droits fondamentaux dans le cadre des activités de l’Agence et consacre le principe de non-refoulement. L’Agence est tenue d’élaborer une stratégie en matière de droits fondamentaux et de mettre en place « un mécanisme efficace » de contrôle de leur respect[7]. Dans ce cadre, sont notamment prévus la nomination d’un officier aux droits fondamentaux, la création d’un forum consultatif sur les droits fondamentaux[8], le développement de programmes de formation prenant en compte les droits fondamentaux et l’adoption de codes de conduite visant à garantir le respect des droits fondamentaux dans toutes les opérations. Les nouvelles dispositions prévoient également la possibilité pour le directeur exécutif de l’agence de suspendre ou de mettre fin à des opérations conjointes et des projets pilotes dans le cas où la violation des droits fondamentaux serait « grave ou susceptible de persister »[9].

Cependant, force est de constater que la plupart des instruments introduits par le règlement n’ont a priori pas de force juridique contraignante (stratégie, codes de conduite, comité consultatif, officier aux droits fondamentaux faisant « régulièrement rapport »[10]) et que le texte du règlement présente de nombreuses zones d’ombre. Comme il ressort de la lettre adressée par le Médiateur européen à Frontex, la portée des dispositions introduites dépendra dans une large mesure de la manière dont l’Agence les mettra en œuvre. Par exemple : quelles seront les véritables responsabilités de l’officier aux droits fondamentaux ? Celui-ci disposera-t-il d’un service lui permettant de contrôler le respect des droits fondamentaux au cours de chaque opération, sur chaque bateau ? Sera-t-il compétent pour recevoir des plaintes d’individus dont les droits fondamentaux ont été violés ? Ou encore : Qui sera tenu responsable de la violation de droits fondamentaux dans le cadre d’opérations conjointes ? Quelles seront les mesures prises en cas de constatation de violation des droits fondamentaux dans Etat membre ou dans un Etat tiers ? Sur quels critères une violation des droits fondamentaux sera-t-elle considérée comme « grave ou susceptible de persister », permettant ainsi de suspendre ou de mettre fin à des opérations ? Cette procédure a-t-elle vocation à s’appliquer également aux opérations de retour dans le pays d’origine ou de transit[11] ? Enfin, le fait que le nouveau texte fournisse à Frontex un cadre juridique pour le traitement des données à caractère personnel laisse de nombreuses questions en suspens, en particulier sur les conditions de collecte, le type d’informations recueillies et le traitement de celles-ci.

L’enquête ouverte par le Médiateur européen est une démarche positive, car elle exigera des clarifications de la part de Frontex quant à la manière dont elle fera respecter les droits fondamentaux dans le cadre de ses activités. Cependant, au-delà de Frontex, il est nécessaire que l’Union européenne fasse évoluer sa politique d’asile et d’immigration vers une conception de la migration non plus seulement orientée par les questions de la sécurité, mais également par la protection des personnes et le droit à la mobilité, ainsi que par la prise en compte de la migration économique en relation avec les besoins des marchés du travail et le développement. En particulier, la politique de collaboration avec des pays tiers devrait être repensée au regard du respect des droits fondamentaux et de la responsabilité de l’Union ou des Etats membres en cas de violation. Dans ce cadre, la Commission européenne a un rôle important à jouer, d’autant plus qu’elle dispose désormais de la possibilité de mettre en demeure un Etat membre, voire de saisir la Cour de justice de l’UE, en cas de non-respect par ce dernier de ses obligations dans le cadre de la politique d’immigration et d’asile.

L’équipe du MPC en collaboration avec Julien Jeandesboz, King’s College, London

Pour lecture :

–          Developing an EU internal security strategy, fighting terrorism and organised crime, Etude du Parlement europeen, 2011, co-redigée par Julien Jeandesboz: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/etudes/libe/2011/462423/IPOL-LIBE_ET(2011)462423_EN.pdf

–          Agence Frontex: Quelles garanties pour les Droits de l’Homme?, Groupe des Verts du Parlement européen, Novembre 2010 : http://europeecologie.eu/IMG/pdf/dossier_frontex.pdf

–          Pushed back, pushed around , Human Rights Watch, 21 Septembre 2009: http://www.hrw.org/reports/2009/09/21/pushed-back-pushed-around-0


[1] http://www.ombudsman.europa.eu/fr/cases/correspondence.faces/en/11316/html.bookmark

[2] Règlement (CE) n° 2007/2004 du Conseil: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:32004R2007:FR:NOT

[3] Intégration des accords de Schengen dans le traité d’Amsterdam, signé en 1997.

[4] Cf. Conclusions des Conseils européens de Tampere (15-16 octobre 1999) et de Séville (21 et 22 juin 2002).

[5] cf. notamment arrêt de la CEDH Hirsi Jamaa and Others v. Italie : http://cmiskp.echr.coe.int/tkp197/view.asp?action=open&documentId=901571&portal=hbkm&source=externalbydocnumber&table=F69A27FD8FB86142BF01C1166DEA398649

et rapport de la Commission des migrations, des réfugiés et de la population de l’Assemblée parlementaire du Conseil de l’Europe  « Lives lost in the Mediterranean Sea : who is responsible ? » : http://assembly.coe.int/CommitteeDocs/2012/20120329_mig_RPT.EN.pdf

[6]Règlement (UE) N° 1168/2011 modifiant le règlement (CE) n° 2007/2004 : http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2011:304:0001:0017:FR:PDF

[7] Nouvel article 26bis par.1.

[8] Seront invités à y participer l’Agence européenne des droits fondamentaux, le Bureau européen d’appui en matière d’asile, le Haut Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés et d’autre organismes concernés, notamment des ONG.

[9] Article 3 par. 1bis.

[10] Nouvel article 26 bis par. 3.

[11] La référence à cette procédure n’apparait pas dans l’article 9 du règlement (UE) N° 1168/2011 consacré aux opérations de retour.